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Indian American girl declared one of brightest students in world

Indian American girl declared one of brightest students in world

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Manipur Manipur

WASHINGTON: A prominent US university has named Natasha Peri,11, Indian-American girl as one of the brightest children in the world for her outstanding performance on the the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) and American College Testing (ACT) standardized examinations.

In the 2020-21 Talent Search year, Peri was one of nearly 19,000 students from 84 countries that joined Center for Talented Youth Talent (CTY).

Many colleges use the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) and the American College Testing (ACT) to assess whether to accept a student for admission.

Companies and non-profits may utilise these results to provide merit-based scholarships in some cases.

Students are required to take either the SAT or the ACT and submit their scores to their chosen universities.

Peri, a student at New Jersey's Thelma L Sandmeier Elementary School, was rewarded for her outstanding achievement on the SAT, ACT, or other similar assessment as part of the (CTY) Search, according to the sources.

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Peri took the Johns Hopkins Talent Search test while she was in Grade 5 in Spring 2021. Her result in both the verbal and quantitative portions was in the 90th percentile of advanced Grade 8 performance.

She was selected for "High Honors Awards" at Johns Hopkins CTY.

"This inspires me to do more," Peri stated, adding that doodling and reading J R R Tolkien's novels might worked for her.

Johns Hopkins policy prohibits granular information is not broken down by age or race. It is also up to the guardian to reveal the prodigy's name. Awardees comes from all 50 states in the United States.

CTY High Honours Awards were awarded to less than 20% of CTY Talent Search participants.

Honorees also selected for CTY's online and summer programmes, which allow brilliant students to connect with other bright children from across the world and establish a community of engaged learners.

"We are pleased to honour these students. Their excitement for learning shined through in a year that was anything but normal and we look forward to assisting them in their development as scholars and citizens throughout high school, college and beyond, "CTY's executive director, Virginia Roach, said in a statement.